Over at National Review Online, Phil Kerpen and James Valvo report that a few environmentalists are starting to catch on that biofuels aren’t all they’re cracked up to be:


Even environmentalists are calling for a halt to government subsidies and mandates on biofuels. Lester Brown, founder and president of the Earth Policy Institute, and Jonathan Lewis, a climate specialist with the Clean Air Task Force, spoke out on Earth Day with an article titled “Ethanol’s Failed Promise.” They outlined the desperate need for Congress to abandon a policy that should never have been enacted. In a daze over rising fuel costs, increased dependence on foreign oil, and a fear of carbon emissions, Congress has been backing the politically favored food-to-fuel ethanol program. But “the mandates are not reducing our dependence on foreign oil,” wrote Brown and Lewis. “Last year, the United States burned about a quarter of its national corn supply as fuel – and this led to only a 1 percent reduction in the country’s oil consumption.”

The failure to reduce oil dependence is not the only flaw in the ethanol program. It also has driven food prices disturbingly high. The World Food Program is warning that the upward pressure on food prices is likely to lead to a “silent tsunami” of hunger. Josette Sheeran, the program’s executive director, warned that “The price of rice has more than doubled in the last five weeks.” The World Bank estimates that food prices have increased by 83 percent in three years. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown acknowledged what many have been saying for years: “The production of biofuels needs to be urgently re-examined.”

More here.