Hey, Republican governors: Want federal funds for disaster preparedness?

Then you'd better quit all that "global warming" denial!

That's the latest pronunciamento from the Federal Emergency Management Agency: No funds for you unless you hop onto the "climate change" bandwagon along with Dems!

Starting next year, the agency will approve disaster-preparedness funds only for states whose governors approve hazard-mitigation plans that address climate change.

This may put several Republican governors who maintain that the Earth isn't warming due to human activities, or prefer to take no action, in a political bind. Their position may block their states' access to hundreds of millions of dollars in FEMA funds. In the last five years, the agency has awarded an average $1 billion a year in grants to states and territories for taking steps to mitigate the effects of disasters.

"If a state has a climate denier governor that doesn't want to accept a plan, that would risk mitigation work not getting done because of politics," said Becky Hammer, an attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council's water program. "The governor would be increasing the risk to citizens in that state" because of his climate beliefs.

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Specifically, beginning in March 2016, states seeking preparedness money will have to assess how climate change threatens their communities. Governors will have to sign off on hazard-mitigation plans. While some states, including New York, have already started incorporating climate risks in their plans, most haven't because FEMA's 2008 guidelines didn't require it.
 

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Among those who could face a difficult decision are New Jersey's Gov. Christie and fellow Republican Govs. Rick Scott of Florida, Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, Greg Abbott of Texas, and Pat McCrory of North Carolina – all of whom have denied man-made climate change or refused to take action.

Bet you didn't realize that FEMA  was in the business of policing Republicans' freedom of speech and freedom of thought. Well it is now. And there's nothing anyone can do about it, because public comment and input isn't part of the disaster-preparedness regulatory setup.

"If a state has a climate denier governor that doesn't want to accept a plan, that would risk mitigation work not getting done because of politics," said Becky Hammer, an attorney with the Natural Resources Defense Council's water program. "The governor would be increasing the risk to citizens in that state" because of his climate beliefs.

In other words: Next time around, elect a politically correct Democratic governor, citizens of Texas, Louisiana, North Carolina, and New Jersey. Or else.